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Prospectus

M.Phil. & Ph.D. Programmes in Development Studies

 

Duration :

The M Phil in Development Studies would be for the duration of 2 years. This would include 2 semesters of course work and 12 months of research and dissertation writing. The candidates would also be expected to develop their proposals during course work.

 

For 2015-2017 Batch Students:

Programme Structure:

1) The M.Phil. Programme in Development Studies, which carries a total of 46 credits, has three components:

Courses

Credits

Compulsory Courses

10

Optional Courses

6

Dissertation

30

Total

46

 

  1. Compulsory Courses (MDS) (10 credits) : The compulsory papers would include two papers on research methods in social sciences and three papers on the thematic area of development.
  2. Optional Courses (MDSO) (6 credits) : The optional papers offered would be based on various sub-themes within development, seeking to address the specialized interests of the students as well as papers on advanced statistical techniques, GIS and spatial statistics. Students would be given the choice of taking three optional papers (of 2 credits each).
  3. Dissertation (MDSD) (30 credits): The dissertation would involve fieldwork, research and writing over a period of one year under the guidance of a faculty supervisor.

 

2) Semester-wise Listing of Courses

Semester

Course Titles

Credits

I

MDS1

Development Discourses And Practices

2

MDS 2

Perspectives In Development

2

MDS 3

Development Experiences- International Perspectives

2

MDS 4

Critical Issues in Philosophy of Social Science Research

2

II

MDS 5

Methodological Issues in Development Research

2

MDSO1

Changing Geopolitics in the Contemporary World Order

2

MDSO2

Social Justice and the City

2

MDSO3

GIS and Spatial Statistics

2

MDSO4

Health, Nutrition and Development

2

MDSO5

Advanced Statistical Techniques

2

MDSO6

Population and Development

2

MDSO7

Idea of India: Discourses and Practices

2

MDSO8

Interpreting Justice and Welfare; An enquiry into the nature of politics

2

MDSO9

State, Democracy and Democratic Politics in India ; Institutions and Processes

2

MDSO10

Tribes in the Contemporary World

2

MDSO11

 Ethnography Governance and the City

2

MDSO12

Public Economics

2

III & IV

MDSD

Dissertation

30

# Students are expected to take 3 optional papers which are of 2 credits each in Semester II

 

3) Provision for supervised Self study papers/Directed Readings can be made for M. Phil, which would enable students to develop core competency in any specific field related to their research.These would be non-graded papers equivalent to auditing. It is not mandatory to have a self study paper. Not more than two self study papers can be taken by students during the Programme. They may approach any faculty member of the Institute for the same. The self study paper would not be exactly identical* to any course offered at the Institute at the Master's level. Faculty concerned would submit a note to the Coordinator of the Programme stating broadly the content and pedagogy of the paper.

(*Note: If the faculty deems it necessary s/he may direct the student to attend the lectures of any existing Master's level course with the prerequisite that the self study has some additional component in terms of content and/or application which makes the course suitable to the M.Phil Progamme).

 

4) The institute has permitted M. Phil students mid stream option, i.e. students who secure 7.5 grade and above in M. Phil coursework can opt for Ph. D soon after his provision applies to M. Phil (Development Studies) also, however the aspirants would be expected to submit a research proposal and face an interview to qualify for the same.

 

5) Pedagogy:

The course work would be based on class room teaching along with other interactive methods of seminar presentations and discussions. The research work would be based on a one-to-one interaction between the guide and the student. However, the student would also be expected to submit reports on regular intervals on the progress in research work to the M. Phil programme coordinator.

 

6) Evaluation:

The students would be evaluated for the course work through end term examinations/ term papers, and class presentations. Prior to submission, the M. Phil student would be expected to make a seminar presentation related to the dissertation. Three copies of the dissertation have to be submitted to the School. The evaluation of the dissertation or research work would be as per the norms and regulations of the UGC.

 

7) M. Phil Course Content:

Compulsory Papers

MDS 1: Development Discourse and Practice

The course focuses on the theorisation of development discourse and challenges mainstream development theories through a longitudinal survey ranging from classical development ideas through post development discourses to contemporary geopolitical realities. Revolving around a historical and interdisciplinary point of view, the course provides a comprehensive critique of the prevailing development paradigms and contextualises the contradictions of the contemporary globalisation process in the light of the above.

MDS 2: Perspectives in Development

Numerous perspectives of development have evolved over decades and sought to interrogate the development processes. The course provides a critical overview of various perspectives in an interdisciplinary framework and examines the current development approaches and associated imperatives. With an emphasis on the landscape of uneven development of contemporary times, the course analyses the dominant development interventions in diverse spheres of economy, polity and culture and aims at building a critical perspective of the prevailing development process.

MDS 3: Development Experiences- International Perspectives

This course attempts to move beyond India and diversify our the understanding of development issues as they emerge in different regions of the world, specifically Latin America, South Asia, South East Asia and Africa. The engagement with development has differed across these four regions, given their differences in history, politics and society, even as they negotiate with similar conditions of colonialism, neo-colonialism and globalization. There are then significant critiques of development that have emerged from these regions, and given their specific histories and cultures, provide different contexts to deliberate on development processes and practice. The course provides a comparative perspective on development processes and experiences in these regions through an inter-discplinary approach.

MDS 4: Critical Issues in Philosophy of Social Science Research

Philosophical perspectives or world-views are immanent in the methodology of social science research. It is not only that ontological positions guide the selection of methodologies but the very fabrication and use of tools and techniques are shot through with world-views. The philosophical world-views underpinning development and social science research are themselves more often than not part and parcel of a gigantic process of impoverishment. Reluctance to recognize them in the general sense is bad enough but the unwillingness to consider them in development research is indeed cause for worry. This course is therefore an exercise in looking at what has turned out to be mainstream philosophical world-views and at elaborating some of their prominent critiques.

MDS 5: Methodological Issues in Development Research

This course would acquaint students with basic processes of development research and would enable them to pursue research in a systematic and critical way. Development Research draws on various streams of social sciences for conceptual and theoretical inspiration. Given the interdisciplinary character of the inquiry, the focus of the course would be on to deliberate upon how to expand the scope of development research, which would be informed by and be relevant to the substantive development issues. It would provide students with a critical perspective on the broad paradigms of development research and introduce them to the repertoire of methodologies borrowing from various disciplines. It would emphasise on transcending the quantitative-qualitative divide and the need to adopt more integrated and diverse set of research strategies.

 

Optional Papers

MDS O1: Changing Geopolitics in the Contemporary World Order

In the last few decades the global political order has got entrenched with issues of ecology, resource, people’s rights, entitlement and an ensuing crisis of space. With the world development map tilting towards a uni-nature development path, there is seen increasing power conflicts at various levels of state and governance, increasing struggle for hegemony in the international finance system and a growing contradiction between the core and the periphery. At the same time, definite patterns of praxis are generating out challenging the hegemonic designs of statecraft and given power structures leading to changing geopolitical constructions. Focusing on the geopolitical condition since the end of the twentieth century, the course seeks to examine the above complexities and trace the trajectory of geopolitics from traditional/ classical to critical geopolitics of contemporary times.

MDS O2: Social Justice and the City

The course aims toengender and further critical understanding among students about spatial justice issues within cities with a focus on the followings concept and issues: conceiving spatial justice; cities and their geographical and sociological imaginations; urban land use; post-Fordist and neoliberal cities – politics, governmentalities, deindustrialisation, informalisation and post-modernisation ; Spatial inequalities within cities; migrants, regional and transnational citizenships; ethnic Identities, urban spaces and problem of ghetto formation; gender and cities; crime, criminality and spatial logics of governance; environmental concerns, resistance and activism; social movements and claim of ‘right to the city’.

MDS O3: GIS and Spatial Statistics

This course aims to provide understanding of practical and theoretical elements of spatial data analysis using GIS and Spatial Statistics softwares. The course requires prior basic understanding of statistics, matrices, and rudiments of projection and scales from students.

MDS O4: Health, Nutrition and Development

As health and nutrition are closely interwoven and multi-dimensional concepts, it is very important to understand their linkages from a developmental perspective. This course aims to provide comprehensive knowledge about relationship between nutrition, health and development with the choice of specialising in a number of topics and in a range of contexts. It is an integrated programme covering nutrition and its effects, food security, health and development. The course would equip the students to understand the inter-linkages between health, nutrition and development.

MDS O5: Advanced Statistical Techniques

Given the realization for undertaking explanatory studies for a comprehensive understanding of various interrelated developmental issues in addition to increasing access to data and technology, it is increasingly felt that scholars need to be equipped with the practical application of advanced statistical techniques. This will greatly enhance not only their understanding of the developmental issues but also provide them an opportunity to learn and adopt the advanced statistical techniques. The course is intended to provide a deeper practical knowledge in causal analysis of the data on various developmental issues by utilising advanced statistical techniques. The strategy would be to simplify the treatment of statistical inference and to focus primarily on how to specify and interpret models in the context of testing causal relationships.

MDS O6: Population and Development

Population and Development are interrelated in complex ways and get affected by each other. The relationship between population and development requires the examination of the population situation in relation to resources, stage of economic development, technology and socio-cultural considerations. Given the fact that the indicators of development improve faster when the population growth slows, it is important to make population planning an integral part of overall development and there is a need to understand the progress in a holistic aspect encompassing a series of issues among population and development. This will enhance knowledge and skills among the students in their understanding of Population and Development linkages.

MDS O7: Idea of India;Discourses & Practices

India has been the subject of very deliberate act of seemingly contradictory forces of transformation and reinvention in the colonial and post-colonial contexts. Rather than an artificial or pure cultural construct, this “idea of India”, has been a deeply contested political project, a work in progress whose contours and trajectories are often liminal than linear. Therefore, the course is intended to enable students to develop an appreciation of the key theorists, texts and debates that inform the spectacular and also turbulent historical and intellectual journey of ideas of democracy, modernity, development, constitutionalism, nationalism, secularism, social justice and various strands of socialism in India.

MDS O8: Interpreting Justice and Welfare: An enquiry into the nature of politics

The course offers a critical and reflective analysis of classical and contemporaries theories of justice with reference to policies and programs of welfare. Revolving around theories of utilitarianism, libertarianism, deontology, communitarianism and egalitarianism, the course will explore “contractarian” and comparative approaches to justice and will invite students to apply notion of justice in the context of distributive justice, growth, poverty, redistribution, affirmative action, livelihood rights etc.

MDS O9: State, Democracy and Democratic Politics in India; Institutions and Processes
This course focuses on historical and institutional trajectories of State and democracy in India with the focus on political institution such as parliament, judiciary and executives. The course not only explores the state-society relations but also critically examines the “democratic paradox’ in India. In other words, the course combines institutional analysis of politics with electoral study for understanding constraint or incentives elections can produce for development process and policy choices. In other words, the course will explore voting as a purposeful political act for realization of 'collective goods' in democracy.

MDS O10: Tribes in the Contemporary World

Tribes and indigenous people, as peoples inhabiting mostly forested areas of the world, share the collective experience of being ousted from their land and forests and denied a right to their way of life. The course in this context seeks to historically trace the victimisation of tribes as a people, through colonialism and thereafter, not just in India, but across the world. Tribal history and the present is also chequered by attempts to resist colonisation- economic, political and intellectual- that has severely undermined them as a people. There have been significant works from among tribes that express this anguish, even as they intellectually engage with questions on what constitutes culture, development and autonomy in the context of their lives. The course would introduce students to these deliberations among tribes on tribal identity, politics, culture, development and autonomy. It would focus and explore the substance and content of these critiques that problematises the concept and practice of development afresh.

MDS O11: Ethnography Governance and the City

This course will enable a critical-reflexive grounding in anthropological theoretical constructs with reference to policy, governance and governmentality in urban contexts. It provides a comparative and ethnographic lens with which students can understand how governance in urban contexts is implicated in the everyday lives of people. While dealing with critiques of governance, development and public policy, the course also reveals the potential of 'ethnographic zoom' in urban studies, to resolutely impact policy making; rather than taking on the role of watchdogs. The course is intended as an invitation to students to attempt to fill a gap in urban studies in India. In this sense it has both pedagogic as well as disciplinary motivations.

 

MDS O12:  Public Economics

This course covers major aspects of the government interaction with the economy. The frame of reference for this course shall be the mixed economy with particular focus on developing countries. This course shall enable students to understand historical and comparative perspective on the growth and transformation of fiscal and economic activities of the government. It deals with contemporary debates on taxation, public expenditure, and government economic policies. Issues related to sovereign debt, austerity and rule based fiscal policy constitute important components of this course. Performance of the public sector over time and process of privatization, disinvestment and Public Private Partnerships find due space in deliberations. It also covers issues related to the federal fiscal structure and intergovernmental economic relations. Overall, the focus of the course is to familiarize students to the government’s fiscal and economic interventions and how the same has defined the constraints and possibilities of development across nations.

 For 2016-2018 Batch Students:

M.PHIL IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (2016-18 BATCH)

 Courses

Credits

Compulsory Courses

12

Optional Courses

8

Dissertation

30

 Total 

50

 SEMESTER-WISE LISTING OF COURSES

Semester

Course Code

Course Title

Credits

COMPULSORY COURSES

I

MDS1

Sociological Perspectives on Development

2

MDS2

Economics of Development

2

MDS3

Development Experiences: International Perspectives

2

MDS4

Philosophical Methods in Social Science Research

2

MDS5

Methodological Issues in Development Research

4

Total

12

OPTIONAL COURSES (ANY FOUR)

II

MDSO1

Changing Geopolitics in the Contemporary World Order

2

MDSO2

Social Justice and the City

2

MDSO3

GIS and Spatial Statistics

2

MDSO4

Health, Nutrition and Development

2

MDSO5

Advanced Statistical Techniques

2

MDSO6

Population and Development

2

MDSO7

Idea of India: Discourses and Practices

2

MDSO8

Interpreting Justice and Welfare; An enquiry into the nature of politics

2

MDSO9

State, Democracy and Democratic Politics in India: Institutions and Processes

2

MDSO10

Tribes in the Contemporary World

2

MDSO11

Ethnography, Governance and the City

2

MDSO12

Public Economics

2

MDSO13

Advanced Microeconomics

2

MDSO14

Macroeconomic Theories and Policies

2

MDSO15

Advanced Statistical Methods in Development Studies

2

MDSO16

Political Economy of Agrarian Relations

2

MDSO17

Sociological Methods in Social Sciences

2

MDSO18

International Relations and Analysis of Foreign Policy

2

 

Total= (4x2)

8

III&IV

 

Dissertation

30

GRAND TOTAL

50


 PH. D. PROGRAMME IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

  1. Programme Structure
  • The Ph. D programme would be for 3 years, with an initial 6 month period for course work. Extension could be granted for 1 year. Thereafter, extension requests would be considered case by case and would not exceed more than 6 months at a time.
  • The School seeks to keep the programme flexible without giving up on the academic rigour necessary for Ph. D research. For this reason, the School has decided to keep the course work optional for those with an M Phil, i.e. a scholar with an M Phil degree may opt out of Ph. D course work if s/he wishes to. This provision also applies to scholars who are enrolled for the M. Phil-Ph. D programme in the School. On completing their M. Phil, they can opt out of the 6 month course work in the Ph. D programme. On the other hand, in certain cases, the School may provide admission to candidates for a direct Ph. D on the condition that they audit the M. Phil course work offered in the School.
  • The Ph. D course work would be of 6 months and would be seminar/workshop based, wherein the scholar would be expected to present 3 papers on her/his related area of research and research methodology. In this duration, the PhD scholar will be affiliated to one or more faculty in the School/Institute who specializes in the related area of research. Besides this, Ph. D scholars would also be expected to work on their proposals and present the same at the end of course work.
  • The scholars would be expected to coordinate with the M. Phil/Ph. D coordinator and decide on the date and topic of the presentations in advance.
  1. Evaluation of Ph. D Course Work

The seminar/workshop papers will be assessed and graded by the faculty members associated  with them.

  1. Examination of the Ph. D Thesis

The evaluation of the Ph. D thesis would be as per the norms and regulations of the UGC, which includes the provision of publishing at least one paper in a peer reviewed journal. Before submission of the thesis, the Ph. D scholar would be expected to make a formal seminar presentation in the School.